Royal North Devon’s 8th hole is falling into the sea

Tania Longmire
By Tania Longmire March 1, 2018 13:11

A golf course regarded by some to be the oldest in England is the latest to warn that it is at risk of coastal erosion.

In the last few weeks a number of organisations, including The R&A and the STRI, have said coastal erosion is a major threat to golf in the UK, while some historic links clubs such as Montrose Links have stated they are losing a significant amount of land each year.

http://www.thegolfbusiness.co.uk/2018/02/all-of-the-uks-links-golf-courses-could-disappear-by-2100/

Now Royal North Devon GC has said parts of its historic course has been washed away by recent storms, and more damage is feared by staff, according to a report on the BBC.

In January Storm Eleanor ripped 15 metres of land away from behind the eighth tee.

General manager Mark Evans warned that more of the course could disappear as the south west of England has been hit by storms this winter, including Storm Emma at the end of February, which closed almost every golf course in south west England and south Wales.

The tee marker for the eighth green was washed on to the beach, which is alongside the 154-year-old course.

‘The seventh green is now within 49 feet of the shoreline and boulders are strewn across that part of the low lying links course,’ said a spokesman.

‘The land the golf course is built on is designated as a Site of Specific Scientific Interest. Natural England, which controls the land, said it had no plans to improve the sea defences.’

The club added in a statement: “The dunes and shingle ridge are naturally dynamic coastal features and subject to constant change.”

It also said the golf club can build two new greens, but must relinquish two existing ones within three years if it does so.

 

Tania Longmire
By Tania Longmire March 1, 2018 13:11
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1 Comment

  1. djm March 1, 16:59

    The last two sentences are most significant.

    The club added in a statement: “The dunes and shingle ridge are naturally dynamic coastal features and subject to constant change. It also said the golf club can build two new greens, but must relinquish two existing ones within three years if it does so”.

    Coastal dynamic change means coastal dynamic change… this has been going on since long before links courses existed, & will continue to do so long after some of them have disappeared. It will of course enable new links to be constructed – if required. Ask Southport & Mussleburgh !

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