Here’s three of the most important stories for the golf industry that happened in September

Alistair Dunsmuir
By Alistair Dunsmuir September 24, 2019 03:40

From another driving range that will be converted into an entertainment centre to the impact The Solheim Cup could have on women’s participation in golf, The Golf Business editor Alistair Dunsmuir reviews September.

Struggling 18-hole golf clubs can diversify their income streams while still offering golf

The 18-hole Hilltop and Manwood Municipal Golf Course in Birmingham now needs to double the amount of rounds per year on its course just to break even.

However, its operator, Mytime Active, might have found a solution. It’s hoping to convert the course from 18 holes to nine, and build next to it an 18-hole footgolf course and a family-friendly driving range, and build a new clubhouse at the same time.

While this requires both significant investment and change, it might be the only way to ensure the venue can grow while still offering golf.

The Solheim Cup could be a breakthrough for female participation

I don’t think a women’s golf event has experienced more interest that The Solheim Cup did, in my lifetime. In fact, I saw more commentary about it on social media than even the very popular BMW PGA Championship, which took place the following week.

15/09/2019. Ladies European Tour 2019. The Solheim Cup, PGA Centenary Course, Gleneagles Hotel, Scotland. 13-15 September 2019. The European team celebrate together as they win the Solheim Cup. Credit: Mark Runnacles/LET

 

14/09/2019. Ladies European Tour 2019. The Solheim Cup, PGA Centenary Course, Gleneagles Hotel, Scotland. 13-15 September 2019. Credit: Phil Inglis

There could not be a better time than now for golf clubs to capitalise on this engrossment.

14/09/2019. Ladies European Tour 2019. The Solheim Cup, PGA Centenary Course, Gleneagles Hotel, Scotland. 13-15 September 2019. Credit: Phil Inglis

 

15/09/2019. Ladies European Tour 2019. The Solheim Cup, PGA Centenary Course, Gleneagles Hotel, Scotland. 13-15 September 2019. Suzann Pettersen of Norway reacts on the 18th green as she sinks her final putt to help Europe win the Solheim Cup. Credit: Mark Runnacles/LET

Converting driving ranges into entertainment centres could be the number one trend of 2019

Topgolf, which offers modern, competitive games on driving ranges while food and beverage is served, has been such a success in England that it is to open its first facility, a three-tiered driving range, in Scotland.

Topgolf. (PRNewsFoto/Topgolf)

And golf clubs are taking note. Wallsend Golf Club in Northumberland is planning to embark on a £12.5 million project that will see its driving range become the UK’s first ‘BigShots Golf’ centre, while in September a financial services company bought Paultons Golf Centre from Crown Golf, and has said it will transform its driving range.

“The US market has seen an explosion in upmarket golf driving ranges,” said Jonathan Gain, chief executive of Stellar Asset Management. “Given that the UK tends to follow US trends, this is an exciting space [that] offers great potential for our investors.”

 

Alistair Dunsmuir
By Alistair Dunsmuir September 24, 2019 03:40
Write a comment

No Comments

No Comments Yet!

Let me tell You a sad story ! There are no comments yet, but You can be first one to comment this article.

Write a comment
View comments

Write a comment

<

Join Our Mailing List


Read the latest issues

Advertise With Us

To advertise in the magazine or online, contact:

Email marketing@thegolfbusiness.co.uk
Tel 020 7803 2453

Twitter Timeline