PGA withdraws from England Golf Partnership

Tania Longmire
By Tania Longmire March 24, 2017 18:16

The body that represents professional golfers in England, the Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA), has said it is amicably withdrawing from the England Golf Partnership (EGP), the lead funding body for golf in England.

The news comes just days after Sport England announced an £8.48m award to the EGP, £6.23 million to boost participation in golf and £2.25 million to invest on developing talent, over the next four years.

England Golf rewarded for boosting participation

It means England Golf, the governing body for amateur golf in England, will solely pull together the sport’s Whole Sport Plan and receive golf’s National Lottery grant under Sport England’s previous strategy.

Sandy Jones, chief executive of the PGA, said: “Following receipt of the news of Sport England’s funding award to golf, amicable discussion took place between England Golf and The PGA.

“In conclusion it was felt that the best outcome for golf in England could be achieved by the PGA stepping out of the EGP, allowing England Golf to be the lead funding body.

“The PGA is, of course, totally committed to working with England Golf and the Golf Foundation to support the growth and development of the game at all levels.

Nick Pink, England Golf chief executive, commented: “England Golf would like to thank the PGA for their great commitment to golf in England, and I look forward to working with them just as closely to deliver on our plans for the game.

“England Golf will work hard to ensure the Sport England award is invested well into golf in England and looks forward to a long and mutually beneficial working relationship with the PGA into the future.”

The news also comes as the chairman of the EGP for the last year, Nic Coward, has been named the first independent chair of England Golf.

Nic Coward

He was selected after a rigorous appointment process which considered a number of high-calibre candidates for the role.

In a 20-year career at the top levels of British sport, Nic has been the general secretary of the Premier League, the chief executive of the British Horseracing Authority, joint chief executive of the Football Association and a director of Wembley Stadium.

He has also been a non-executive director of the FA, was treasurer of the CCPR (now the Sport and Recreation Alliance) and first chair of the global Sports Rights Owners Coalition. He now consults to a number of sports and entertainment businesses in the UK and around the world, as well as non-executive roles away from sport.

Nic said: “Golf in England has a huge amount to be proud of, from Olympic gold to huge impact in communities across the country. There is great work going on at every level of the game. What is really exciting is the opportunity to do even more, to get more people playing, more often.”

Nick Pink added: “I am delighted to welcome Nic as chair of England Golf. Nic has been working closely with us already and has a good understanding of what we do as an organisation. I believe his background and strong networks will significantly help England Golf, and I look forward to working with Nic in the future.”

 

Tania Longmire
By Tania Longmire March 24, 2017 18:16
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1 Comment

  1. Martin Williams March 28, 08:48

    I would like to hope that with this excellent injection of funding, that positive and progressive action is taken to recognise Disability Golf, help Promote Disability Golf and forcibly bring together the various organisational groups representing DG under one umbrella. UK should be hosting World Leading events ( like the SA Open via SADGA) and attracting the best international talent to come and play. Equally, we should be at the forefront of getting disability golf into the Paralympics given that it is now featured in mainstream Olympics.

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